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Jacksonville

Jacksonville is one of the oldest venues for a federal courthouse in the District. An ornate 1895 structure (above left), it served as the Post Office, the home of numerous federal offices, and the District Court. It survived the Great Fire of 1901 but was replaced by a larger and equally ornate building on Monroe Street in 1933 (above right). That courthouse, with massive marble hallways and wood paneled courtrooms, served as the U.S. Courthouse and Post Office until 2003. That year, construction was completed on the present courthouse (below). Near the heart of historic Jacksonville, almost on the same site as the previous buildings, the current courthouse has state of the art courtroom technology and the highest levels of security. In 2006, President George W. Bush signed a bill designating this courthouse as the John Milton Bryan Simpson United States Courthouse. Judge Simpson was appointed to the federal bench in 1950 and joined the Middle District in 1962. He later served on both the Fifth and Eleventh Circuit Courts of Appeals. His decisions were instrumental in desegregating schools and other facilities in the Middle District. The U.S. District Court, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, and three judges of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit occupy this facility.